WE ARE PROUD OF THE COMMENTS AND ARTICLES ABOUT OUR PRODUCTS
Here is a selection:

We are featured in American Handgunner© (July/August, 2007), Soldier Of Fortune© (January, 2007), Successful Hunter© (May/June, 2004), Combat Handguns© (January 2002), Gun Buyers Annual© (2002), The American Rifleman© (Dec 2001), Rifle Shooter Magazine© (Dec/Jan 2001), Guns and Ammo© (December 2001 and December 2000).

GUNS MAGAZINE©, JUNE 2002: “Outside the good folks at the factory in North Haven, Conn., probably no one knows as much about Marlin rifles as Jim West of Wild West Guns in Anchorage, Alaska.” - Jim Gardner

GUNS AND AMMO©, DECEMBER 2000: “I found the Copilot carbine to be a hoot to fire and extremely accurate…at 100 yards the 457 consistently produced one inch groups…” - Bart Skelton

JEFF COOPER’S COMMENTARIES©, OCTOBER 1998: “The 19th century might properly be called the century of the rifle, but the successful employment of this artifact has continued on into the 20th. I am a man of the 20th century, and my rifle has lived with me as my intimate companion since I was old enough to carry it. It is interesting to note that in this age of the scientific revolution relatively little improvement (a part from the mighty Garand) has been brought forth in the rifle itself, this in opposition to the enormous changes which were seen in the 19th century. Now as the 20th century winds down and we look forward to the future, I consider that there are three noteworthy forward steps in the design and fabrication of the rifles themselves. These steps are embodied in three rifles: the Blaser R93, the “Co-Pilot” of Jim West, and, of course, the Steyr Scout. Each of these three weapons has created its own niche, as opposed to those rifles which fill a niche already there. In a sense, you can do certain things with each of these three that could not have been done as well with any weapon previously existing. That is a broad claim, but I am confident that it can be supported.”

AMERICAN SURVIVAL GUIDE©, DECEMBER 1998: “The most obviously unique feature to the Co-Pilot is the take down conversion performed by Wild West Guns. This involves meticulous machine work and craftsmanship to come up with a system that is easy to operate, yet locks up tightly and retains proper headspace.” - Paul Hantke

GUNS & AMMO©, SEPTEMBER 1996: “I was able to deliver the… Co-Pilot from Wild West in Alaska to it’s new home in Africa [with Danie van Graan]… It was much admired in the field and one of it’s most admired features was the sighting system I proposed, which consists of a brilliant red shrouded bead front and a ghost ring rear. This is about the fastest arrangement I have seen… The action handled a sock full of 500 grain reloads without a hitch, and the muzzle brake holds recoil down to a surprisingly comfortable level.” – Jeff Cooper

We are also featured in Foreign Articles: CIBLES (January 1997 – French),  Visier-Das Internationale Waffen-Magazine (September 1995 – German) and VAAPEN (August/November 2005 – Swedish)

African Professional Hunter, ENGONYAMENI SAFARIS: “I have used and carried my Co-Pilot 45-70 with aperture sights and a ‘Fire’ front sight… I could not have made a better choice, specially when following a wounded Leopard at night!” - Danie van Graan

GUNS MAGAZINE©, APRIL 1996: “Unlike other lever guns today, Jim West’s creation, the Co-Pilot, is a takedown model…it is possible to sight in the takedown carbine, remove the barrel, pack both parts in the padded case, and then reassemble in the hunting area, knowing the lever gun will remain sighted in” - John Taffin

MODERN GUN©: Accuracy [of the Co-Pilot] was simply tremendous. At 100 yards, the groups stayed between 7/8 to 1 1/4 inches. All in all, this is a tremendous package for the guy who has everything…especially for the guy who needs an easy to carry package with lots of tough and reliable power.”
- Jim Shults